Phishing - don't take the bait

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Phishing: How scammers are using the recent tragedy of Hurricane Harvey to their advantage

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Phishing: How scammers are using the recent tragedy of Hurricane Harvey to their advantage

infographic

Phishing: How scammers are using the recent tragedy of Hurricane Harvey to their advantage

infographic

Phishing: How scammers are using the recent tragedy of Hurricane Harvey to their advantage

SCHRIEVER AIR FORCE BASE, Colo.-- --

 

“In line with past disasters, criminals seek to profit from disasters by means of fraud. Types of fraud usually associated with natural disasters that all should be aware of are websites that spoof those legitimate charitable organizations to steal people’s credit card numbers, bank account information, social security numbers and other personal information. Phishing emails, or spam, with links that redirect your web browser to those spoofed sites. Emails that trick people into opening virus–laden attachments under guise that they’re opening photos of hurricane damage.

Be cautious in your giving. Don’t respond to any unsolicited incoming emails requesting donations, even if they look like they’re coming from reputable charitable organizations. Reputable charities don’t use spam to solicit donations. To make sure your donation is going to a legitimate, U.S.–based non-profit organization such as redcross.org, type the charity’s web address directly into your web browser. Be leery of emails with attachments, even if they’re from someone you know.” – Air Force Office of Special Investigations public bulletin

(U.S. Air Force graphic/Airman 1st Class William Tracy)