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87 APS compete in Port Dawg Challenge

Tech. Sgt. John Hardisky, 87th Aerial Port Squadron cargo processing supervisor, hauls cargo chains across a competition course during the 87th Aerial Port Squadron’s semi-annual Port Dawg Challenge Oct. 17, 2020. Port Dawgs rely on chains to secure a variety of cargo types for military airlift.

Tech. Sgt. John Hardisky, 87th Aerial Port Squadron cargo processing supervisor, hauls cargo chains across a competition course during the 87th Aerial Port Squadron’s semi-annual Port Dawg Challenge Oct. 17, 2020. Port Dawgs rely on chains to secure a variety of cargo types for military airlift.

Airmen of the 87th Aerial Port Squadron use chains to restrain a 463L pallet (a standardized pallet used for transporting military air cargo). This challenge simulated tying down a vehicle on a C-17 Globemaster III and calculated the effectiveness angle of the chains. A forklift was backed up to the edge of the pallet, and the group was given two different angles and lengths to figure out the effective restraint that each chain would provide.

Airmen of the 87th Aerial Port Squadron use chains to restrain a 463L pallet (a standardized pallet used for transporting military air cargo). This challenge simulated tying down a vehicle on a C-17 Globemaster III and calculated the effectiveness angle of the chains. A forklift was backed up to the edge of the pallet, and the group was given two different angles and lengths to figure out the effective restraint that each chain would provide.

Staff Sgt. Dylan Lewis-Lee, 87th Aerial Port Squadron ramp operations specialist, tightens the net on a training pallet during the 87th Aerial Port Squadron’s semi-annual Port Dawg Challenge Oct. 17, 2020. Cargo is prepared for military airlift using strict guidelines based on weight, height, shape and transportation priority, so Port Dawgs must be proficient in numerous methods of securing cargo with nets, chains and straps.

Staff Sgt. Dylan Lewis-Lee, 87th Aerial Port Squadron ramp operations specialist, tightens the net on a training pallet during the 87th Aerial Port Squadron’s semi-annual Port Dawg Challenge Oct. 17, 2020. Cargo is prepared for military airlift using strict guidelines based on weight, height, shape and transportation priority, so Port Dawgs must be proficient in numerous methods of securing cargo with nets, chains and straps.

Staff Sgt. Edward Dunn, 87th Aerial Port Squadron fleet specialist, prepares to toss a bag across the cargo warehouse as part of the 87th Aerial Port Squadron’s semi-annual Port Dawg Challenge Oct. 17, 2020. The bag toss was one of several events designed to strengthen camaraderie and teamwork among squadron members.

Staff Sgt. Edward Dunn, 87th Aerial Port Squadron fleet specialist, prepares to toss a bag across the cargo warehouse as part of the 87th Aerial Port Squadron’s semi-annual Port Dawg Challenge Oct. 17, 2020. The bag toss was one of several events designed to strengthen camaraderie and teamwork among squadron members.

WRIGHT-PATTERSON AIR FORCE BASE, Ohio --

Members of the 87th Aerial Port Squadron competed in 11 events throughout the course of the day during the squadron’s semi-annual Port Dawg Challenge Oct. 17, 2020 at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio. The event incorporated the various skills necessary to safely and effectively prepare and move cargo for airlift, which is the primary focus of aerial ports like this one. Using a team-based points system, squadron leadership designed the Port Dawg Challenge with the intention of enhancing job proficiency while encouraging camaraderie among Airmen.

The aerial port squadron is responsible for preparing and moving cargo, passengers, and their baggage at military installations across the globe, and training events like this one help to standardize processes to ensure seamless operations.