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Wright-Patt, Luke AFB Citizen Airmen train with Army Reserve

First Lt. Megan K. Busellato, 445th Aeromedical Staging Squadron physician assistant, inserts an intraosseous needle into a bone during Tactical Combat Casualty Care training, Aug. 7, 2021.

First Lt. Megan K. Busellato, 445th Aeromedical Staging Squadron physician assistant, inserts an intraosseous needle into a bone during Tactical Combat Casualty Care training, Aug. 7, 2021.Personnel from the 445th Aeromedical Staging Squadron and 445th Aeromedical Evacuation Squadron joined Army medical personnel from the 84th Training Command, Fort Knox, Kentucky Aug. 6-7, 2021 for a joint force exercise specifically designed to increase skills in caring for combat wounded in challenging remote locations where traditional medical evacuation may not be possible.

Members of the 244th Aviation Combat Brigade, Fort Knox, Kentucky undergo Tactical Combat Casualty Care training, Aug. 7, 2021.

Members of the 244th Aviation Combat Brigade, Fort Knox, Kentucky undergo Tactical Combat Casualty Care training, Aug. 7, 2021. Personnel from the 445th Aeromedical Staging Squadron and 445th Aeromedical Evacuation Squadron joined Army medical personnel from the 84th Training Command, Fort Knox, Kentucky Aug. 6-7, 2021 for a joint force exercise specifically designed to increase skills in caring for combat wounded in challenging remote locations where traditional medical evacuation may not be possible.

WRIGHT-PATTERSON AFB, OHIO -- U.S. Air Force members of the 944th Aeromedical Staging Squadron (ASTS) train members of the 445th ASTS in Tactical Combat Casualty Care (TCCC) at Wright State University’s National Center for Medical Readiness, also called “Calamityville,” in Fairborn, Ohio, August 7, 2021. “Calamityville” is a training, testing, and research venue where military and civilian emergency first responders hone their skills while building relationships. The training was designed to increase skills in caring for combat wounded in challenging remote locations where traditional medical evacuation may not be possible. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Matthew Bruch)

WRIGHT-PATTERSON AFB, OHIO -- U.S. Air Force members of the 944th Aeromedical Staging Squadron (ASTS) train members of the 445th ASTS in Tactical Combat Casualty Care (TCCC) at Wright State University’s National Center for Medical Readiness, also called “Calamityville,” in Fairborn, Ohio, August 7, 2021. “Calamityville” is a training, testing, and research venue where military and civilian emergency first responders hone their skills while building relationships. The training was designed to increase skills in caring for combat wounded in challenging remote locations where traditional medical evacuation may not be possible. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Matthew Bruch)

WRIGHT-PATTERSON AFB, OHIO -- U.S. Air Force Reserve Citizen Airmen from the 445th Aeromedical Evacuation Squadron perform a patient transfer from a U.S. Army Reserve HH-60M Black Hawk MEDEVAC helicopter, 244th Aviation Combat Brigade, on Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio, August 6, 2021. The 944th Aeromedical Staging Squadron from Luke AFB, Arizona aligned their annual training this year with the 445th Airlift Wing to maximize training capabilities by utilizing medical training facilities and En-Route Patient Staging System mission essential squadrons located at Wright-Patterson AFB. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Matthew Bruch)

WRIGHT-PATTERSON AFB, OHIO -- U.S. Air Force Reserve Citizen Airmen from the 445th Aeromedical Evacuation Squadron perform a patient transfer from a U.S. Army Reserve HH-60M Black Hawk MEDEVAC helicopter, 244th Aviation Combat Brigade, on Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio, August 6, 2021. The 944th Aeromedical Staging Squadron from Luke AFB, Arizona, aligned their annual training this year with the 445th Airlift Wing to maximize training capabilities by utilizing medical training facilities and En-Route Patient Staging System mission essential squadrons located at Wright-Patterson AFB. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Matthew Bruch)

WRIGHT-PATTERSON AFB, OHIO -- U.S. Air Force 445th Aeromedical Evacuation Squadron members stabilize a simulated patient after having the patient transferred from the 944th Aeromedical Staging Squadron at Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio, August 6, 2021. The 944th ASTS from Luke AFB, Arizona, aligned their annual training this year with the 445th ASTS to maximize training capabilities by utilizing medical training facilities and En-Route Patient Staging System mission essential squadrons located at Wright-Patterson AFB. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Matthew Bruch)

WRIGHT-PATTERSON AFB, OHIO -- U.S. Air Force 445th Aeromedical Evacuation Squadron members stabilize a simulated patient after having the patient transferred from the 944th Aeromedical Staging Squadron at Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio, August 6, 2021. The 944th ASTS from Luke AFB, Arizona, aligned their annual training this year with the 445th ASTS to maximize training capabilities by utilizing medical training facilities and En-Route Patient Staging System mission essential squadrons located at Wright-Patterson AFB. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Matthew Bruch)

WRIGHT-PATTERSON AFB, OHIO -- U.S. Air Force Reserve Citizen Airmen with the 944th Aeromedical Staging Squadron (ASTS) and the 445th ASTS prepare to conduct aircraft familiarization and En-Route Patient Staging System (ERPSS) training on a C-17 Globemaster III at Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio, August 5, 2021. The 944th ASTS from Luke AFB, Arizona, aligned their annual training this year with the 445th ASTS to maximize training capabilities by utilizing medical training facilities and ERPSS mission essential squadrons located at Wright-Patterson AFB. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Matthew Bruch)

WRIGHT-PATTERSON AFB, OHIO -- U.S. Air Force Reserve Citizen Airmen with the 944th Aeromedical Staging Squadron (ASTS) and the 445th ASTS prepare to conduct aircraft familiarization and En-Route Patient Staging System (ERPSS) training on a C-17 Globemaster III at Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio, August 5, 2021. The 944th ASTS from Luke AFB, Arizona, aligned their annual training this year with the 445th ASTS to maximize training capabilities by utilizing medical training facilities and ERPSS mission essential squadrons located at Wright-Patterson AFB. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Matthew Bruch)

WRIGHT-PATTERSON AIR FORCE BASE, Ohio --

Personnel from the 445th Aeromedical Staging Squadron and 445th Aeromedical Evacuation Squad­ron joined Army medical personnel from the 84th Training Command, Fort Knox, Kentucky Aug. 6-7, 2021 for a joint force exercise specifically designed to increase skills in caring for combat wounded in chal­lenging remote locations where traditional medical evacuation may not be possible.

Operation Serpentine Wall also included reservists from the 944th Fighter Wing, Luke Air Force Base, Arizona, as well as local civilian partners.

Every participant in the exercise, whether civilian or military, worked together in consort toward com­mander, Air Force Reserve Command, Lt. Gen. Rich­ard Scobee’s first priority, “To prioritize strategic depth and accelerate readiness.”

The events focused on streamlining three key trau­ma care events: airlift coordination, battle field readi­ness skills, and ground triage and transport.

Training conducted Aug. 6 focused on airlift coor­dination. Airmen from the 445th AES stabilized simu­lated patients brought on board a 445th Airlift Wing C-17 Globemaster III by reservists from the 445th ASTS and the 944th ASTS. The 944th ASTS aligned their annual training with the 445th ASTS to maxi­mize training capabilities of the En-Route Patient Staging System (ERPSS) mission which isn’t available at Luke AFB.

In addition to the C-17, Army he­licopters also played a key role in the training by providing medical evacu­ation support.

Lt. Col. Michael Policastro, 445th ASTS Critical Care Air Transport Team flight commander and physi­cian in charge, orchestrated multi-service airlift training with Army re­servists from Fort Knox.

“The development of this exer­cise is the result of ever-changing real-world tactics and real-world operative theaters. We began to see the need for joint-force training to combine Army and Air Force medi­cal processes.”

Policastro said Soldiers and Air­men frequently deploy together and need to quickly adapt to different medical sequences and terminology. Depending on the situation, patients may be evacuated and transported on either a Blackhawk helicopter or a C-17 Globemaster III.

“This was unregulated training between the Army medics, AE medi­cal crew and CCATT for integrated care coordination. Coordination of Operation Serpentine Wall involved true joint force command elements from Army and Air Force mem­bers,” Policastro said.

Maj. Forrest Holdsworth, company commander, 5th Battalion, 159th Aviation Regiment, Fort Knox, Kentucky said, “The first time we integrated with Air Force medics was in U.S. Cen­tral Command. We had to adapt our processes on the spot while performing missions. As a re­sult, we had the idea to inte­grate training at home before we meet in theater again.”

Holdsworth finds value for his Soldiers in participating in “tail-to-tail transfers” between helicopters and airplanes.

“Training with our Air Force counterparts is extremely im­portant because the faster we work, the more lives we can potentially save,” Holdsworth said.

During the course of their annual tour, Luke Airmen serv­ing in the medical career field, such as aerospace medical service and health ser­vice management, worked tirelessly on comprehen­sive medical readiness program requirements (CMRP) and Tactical Combat Casualty Care (TCCC), formerly known as self-aid and buddy care.

With a cadre of certified instruc­tors, the 944th ASTS was able to train and certify 19 members of the 445th ASTS in Tactical Combat Ca­sualty Care while training at Calami­tyville.

Master Sgt. Justin Sanderson, 944th FW air staging technician, is proud of the 27 people involved in the exercises from Luke AFB.

“They took time away from their families and completed hundreds of tasks. Nineteen people will be TCCC certified at the end of the annual tour,” Sanderson said.

The final training for the all mem­bers took place mid-morning Aug. 7 at Wright State University’s Calami­tyville campus. Calamityville is a training, testing, and research venue where military and civilian emergen­cy responders hone their skills while building relationships.

Inside a complex concrete struc­ture that resembles a war zone-dam­aged abandoned industrial build­ing, service members participated in hands-on training. Each training station provided refresher informa­tion on TCCC topics ranging from trauma assessment and tourniquet application to radio etiquette.

After lunch, a capstone activity involving simu­lated battle field explosions and machine gun fire left 30 “casualties” throughout the Calamityville complex. Through high-pressure battlefield simulations, service members acted quickly using their existing skillsets. “Casu­alties” were made to appear injured through the use of prosthetics and makeup, and coached to exhibit symptoms including shock, lacerations, blunt force trauma and nu­merous other injuries.

Col. Roberta Stemen, 445th ASTS commander, is proud of of her Airmen’s hard work and the success of the training.

“My vision was clear and concise. We need to train to deploy and what we’ve done this weekend is remarkable,” Stemen said.